Chris Round

© Chris Round

RoundThePlace.com

I am primarily interested in documenting the everyday world around me, with a particular interest in landscapes featuring human interventions that visually activate their surroundings in strangely compelling ways. I am drawn to spaces that convey surreal or fictitious narratives, fortuitously photogenic environments that I try to carefully document rather than photographically exaggerate. Some of my work also explores the notion of place in the context of my dual citizenship of Australia and the UK. Often my Australian landscapes are shot under the soft light of overcast days, conditions more in keeping with my younger days in England – the muted tones portray an evenly balanced sense of place: an Australian scene with an “English” sky. Occasionally I will throw all of the above out of the window and experiment with something new.

— Chris Round, Sydney, Australia

© Chris Round

© Chris Round3

Chris Mottalini

© Chris Mottalini

Mottalini.com

Land of Smiles is a quiet, surreal exploration of Thailand’s everyday architecture and landscapes.

I have spent a considerable amount of time in Thailand over the past five or so years (my wife is from Bangkok). Still, I remain an outsider and am fascinated by many aspects of the landscape that most Thais would never think twice about. The images featured here focus on the accidentally sculptural fluorescent bulb streetlights and nightscapes of rural Thailand.  

Land of Smiles takes you on a walking tour in a dream-state. This is Thailand as few people will ever see it (especially in light of the political turmoil and chaos of the past decade).

— Chris Mottalini, Brooklyn, New York, USA

© Chris Mottalini

© Chris Mottalini3

Chris Norris

© Chris Norris

TheChrisProject.com

The Final Day is a hyperlocal, intimate look at my neighborhood in Madison, Wisconsin. I reject the notion that travel and the exotic are somehow integral to photography projects. The photographs in this series were all taken within walking distance of my house over a period of 100 days. After shooting, I came up with a presentation based on a narrative of a three-day countdown to an unmentioned event that takes place after the final day. As we get closer to the event, the photographs grow more and more tense.

— Chris Norris, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

60/TS/100

60/TS/100