Daniel Bushaway

JUN 28 Daniel Bushaway


Still Places is an observation of human scale within nature, in stark contrast to the manicured vistas of city life.

This series represents my two-year journey into residential rural Victoria and explores a personal interplay with the landscape that surrounds the remote location of Moonee Creek Cooperative, Lima East. I take inspiration from communities that live harmoniously with nature and connected to the land – “off-the-grid” so to speak.

Creating this body of work has enabled me to undertake a journey into isolation, stillness and ultimately my rural utopian dreams.

— Daniel Bushaway, Melbourne, Australia

© Daniel Bushaway

© Daniel Bushaway3

Daniel Mirer


The ArchitorSpace photographs display my specific interest in as well my fear of enclosed areas and the banality of urban spaces. These places are typologies of contemporary post-industrial architectural aesthetic which makes the individual appear so displaced within the uncanny. The photographic strategy is to purposefully make these images heavy with absence; these forgotten deserted (non-sites) are environments that are entirely familiar revealing no history or functionality but yet are commonplace.

The environments depicted within the images are sites that conjure up subconscious memories pointing out the familiarity within the redundancy of blandness within postindustrial space. These non-spaces that exist in the images are the enclosed public arenas in which you are viewed and exposed to the scrutiny of others. They reveal an emptiness that is particularly banal, and commonplace, that has become the current prominent state within the post-industrial spaces that we as a modern society navigate and inhabit.

I photograph these  locations from a direct, frontal point of view, at sufficient distance to include the entire space creating a flat and melancholic state. These architectural portraits become places of a matter-of-fact that demonstrates a primary function of the still photographic image: to record. The photographs are of spaces in which a building facade, alley or a corridor is virtually indistinguishable from another; repetition and redundancy collapse into an architectural singularity. Within the images, the subjects who otherwise occupy these spaces are engulfed into the void of here-could-be-anywhere, into the monumental dissolution of space in contemporary architecture.

— Daniel Mirer, Leiden, Netherlands

Daniel George


The contemporary landscape is detailed and intricate. It is divided into segments that are separately owned and diversely maintained. Through photography I am exploring these unique subsections that form this complex environment. I am observing and recording these characteristics to better understand the makeup of my surroundings.

I am interested in learning why particular locations are given such special attention. I am focusing on variations of land, which reveal an individual’s personal reflection of, and relationship to the environment. Their interconnection is conveyed through directly manipulating and placing objects within the landscape. Often, the attempt is to emulate an ideal natural world.

I am especially drawn to interactions that are distinct and whimsical. I view these spaces as types of sub-landscapes, which when assembled depict an eccentric man-made world. These images are my contemplation of artificial environments whose quirky intricacies describe the formation of the modern landscape.

— Daniel George, Savannah, Georgia, USA

Daniel Kariko


Florida’s inland highways are littered with signs announcing residential development opportunities, proclaiming “A Great Place to Live!”

Sprouting subdivisions are replacing orange groves, palmettos and cattle land. These primarily-agricultural spaces have been converted into speculative housing, riding the wave of Florida’s latest cash crop. However, the idyllic roadside billboards paint a much different picture than the life in these undeveloped and ghostly instant-communities. Promises of fulfillment of the American dream crumbled since the beginning of the real-estate bust in 2007.

The aerial photographs of central Florida’s arrested suburban developments create patterns of human habitation in crisis. From the air, negative imprint of suburbia and its effect on nearby farmland and forests is evident.

This project seeks to evaluate the liminal landscape of central Florida by using the vantage point of aerial photography and juxtaposing it with images from within these unfinished and abandoned cul-de-sacs.

— Daniel Kariko